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cifs

July 7th, 2009

Table of Contents

NAME

cifs – summary of cifs commands

SYNOPSIS

Command Summary

This is a list of the subcommands of the cifs command.

cifs access
Modifies share-level Access Control List (ACL) entries.

cifs audit
Configures CIFS auditing.

cifs broadcast
Display a message on user workstations.

cifs changefilerpwd
schedules a domain password change for the filer.

cifs comment
Displays/modifies the CIFS server description.

cifs help
Display a list of CIFS commands.

cifs homedir
Manage CIFS home directory paths.

cifs lookup
Translates user/group names into SIDs, and vice versa.

cifs gpresult
Displays the resultant set of group policy for this filer.

cifs gpupdate
Refreshes group policy settings.

cifs nbalias
Manage CIFS NetBIOS aliases.

cifs restart
Restarts CIFS or reactivates CIFS service for a single volume if either has been shut down with cifs terminate.

cifs sessions
Displays current configuration and current connections.

cifs setup
Configures CIFS service.

cifs shares
Displays/modifies the CIFS exports.

cifs stat
Displays operational statistics.

cifs terminate
Shuts down CIFS, ends CIFS service for a volume, or logs off a single station.

cifs testdc
Tests the filer’s connection to domain controllers.

cifs adupdate
Update the filer’s account information on the Active Directory server.

VFILER CONSIDERATIONS

When run from a vfiler context, (e.g. via the vfiler run command), cifs operates on the concerned vfiler.

SEE ALSO

cifs_access , cifs_audit , cifs_broadcast , cifs_comment , cifs_help , cifs_homedir , cifs_lookup , cifs_nbalias , cifs_restart , cifs_sessions , cifs_setup , cifs_shares , cifs_stat , cifs_testdc , cifs_adupdate , cifs_terminate , cifs , vfiler


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charmap

July 7th, 2009

Table of Contents

NAME

charmap – command for managing per-volume character maps

SYNOPSIS

charmap [ volname [ mapspec ] ]

DESCRIPTION

The charmap command can be used to manage a character map which is used to allow CIFS clients to access files with NFS names that would otherwise not be valid for CIFS. Without a mapping, in such a case the CIFS client will see and must use the 8.3 format name that ONTAP generates for these names.

USAGE

charmap volname mapspec

This form of the command associates the mapspec with the named volume. The format of the mapspec is as follows:

hh:hhhh[, hh:hhhh]…

Each "hh" represents a hexadecimal value. It does not have to be zero-padded, and upper- or lowercase hex "A”-“F" are accepted. The first value of each colon-separated pair is the hex value of the NFS byte to be translated, and the second value is the Unicode value to be substituted for CIFS use. See the "Examples" section below to see how this is done.

charmap volname "”

This command will remove any existing mapping from the named volume.

charmap [volname]

Without a mapspec, the existing character map for the named volume is displayed. If no volume is named, the character map, if any, for each volume is displayed.

EXAMPLES

charmap desvol 3e:ff76, 3c:ff77, 2a:ff78, 3a:ff79

This command will map a set of characters (>, <, *, and :) into Japanese Unicode characters that are not normally used as normal characters in filenames. This mapping will apply to the volume named "desvol”.

NOTES

The NFS characters that can be remapped are restricted to those that are invalid for Windows: " (22 = double quote), * (2A = asterisk), : (3A = colon), < (3C = less than), > (3E = greater than), ? (3F = question mark), \ (5C = backslash), and (7C = pipe). Values from 01 to 1F can also be mapped.

It is important to note that the Unicode characters must not appear normally in existing filenames, because otherwise unwanted mappings would occur, resulting in loss of the ability to access mapped files. For example, if ":" were mapped to "-“, but "-" appeared in files normally, a Windows client using the mapped share to access a file named "a-b” would have its request mapped to the NFS name "a:b”, which is not the desired file.

Note also that only CIFS client accesses will have this mapping. The on-disk names are the same as they would be if an NFS client were creating/operating using the mapped file names. If the mapping is later changed, the UNIX names and DOS 8.3 names will not be affected.

If a volume is read-only, it is still possible to assign a charmap to it. However the value will not be persistent.

BUGS

The characters of the NFS name are considered one byte at a time. that means that multi-byte character sets may have false substitutions. In general it is advisable to avoid multi-byte character sets in the names of files to be mapped.

LIMITATIONS

Case sensitivity

Because the mapped Windows names turn into NFS names, the lookup of the names follows NFS semantics. That includes the fact that NFS lookups are case-sensitive. That means the applications accessing mapped shares must not rely on Windows caseinsensitive behavior. However the 8.3 name is available, and that is case-insensitive.

Partial or invalid mappings

After mapping a name to return to clients doing directory enumeration (“dir”), the resulting Unicode name is checked for Windows validity. If that name still has invalid characters in it, or if it is otherwise invalid for Windows (e.g. it ends in "." or blank) the 8.3 name is returned instead of the invalid name.


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disk

July 7th, 2009

Table of Contents

NAME

disk – RAID disk configuration control commands

SYNOPSIS

disk assign {<disk_name> | all | [-T <storage type>] -n <count> | auto } [-p <pool>] [-o <ownername>] [-s {<sysid>|unowned}] [-c {block|zoned}] [-f]

disk fail [-i] [-f] <disk_name>

disk maint start [-t test_list] [-c cycle_count] [-f] [-i] -d disk_list

disk maint abort disk_list

disk maint list

disk maint status [-v] [ disk_list]

disk reassign {-o old_name | -s old_sysid} [-n new_name] [-d new_sysid]

disk remove [-w] <disk_name>

disk replace start [-f] <disk_name> <spare_disk_name>

disk replace stop <disk_name>

disk sanitize start [-p <pattern1>|-r [-p <pattern2>|-r [-p <pattern3>|-r]]] [-c <number_of_cycles>] <disk_list>

disk sanitize abort <disk_list>

disk sanitize status [ <disk_list>]

disk sanitize release <disk_list>

disk scrub start

disk scrub stop

disk show [ -o <ownername> | -s <sysid> | -u | -n | -v -a ]

disk swap

disk unswap

disk upgrade_ownership

disk zero spares

DESCRIPTION

The disk fail command forces a file system disk to fail. The disk reassign command is used in maintenance mode to reassign disks after the nvram card has been swapped. The disk remove command unloads a spare disk so that you can physically remove the disk from the filer. The disk replace command can be used to replace a file system disk with a more appropriate spare disk.

The disk scrub command causes the filer to scan disks for media errors. If a media error is found, the filer tries to fix it by reconstructing the data from parity and rewriting the data. Both commands report status messages when the operation is initiated and return completion status when an operation has completed.

The filer’s “hot swap” capability allows removal or addition of disks to the system with minimal interruption to file system activity. Before you physically remove or add a SCSI disk, use the disk swap command to stall I/O activity. After you removed or added the disk, file system activity automatically continues. If you should type the disk swap command accidentally, or you choose not to swap a disk at this time, use disk unswap to cancel the swap operation and continue service.

If you want to remove or add a fibre channel disk, there is no need to enter the disk swap command.

Before you swap or remove a disk, it is a good idea to run syconfig -r to verify which disks are where.

The disk zero spares command zeroes out all non-zeroed RAID spare disks. The command runs in the background and can take much time to complete, possibly hours, depending on the number of disks to be zeroed and the capacity of each disk. Having zeroed spare disks available helps avoid delay in creating or extending an aggregate. Spare disks that are in the process of zeroing are still eligible for use as creation, extension, or reconsruct disks. After invoking the command, the aggr status -s command can be used to verify the status of the spare disk zeroing.

The disk assign and disk show commands are available only on systems with software-based disk ownership, and are used to assign, or display disk ownership.

The disk upgrade_ownership command is available only from maintenance mode, and is used to change the disk ownership model.

The disk sanitize start, disk sanitize abort, and disk sanitize status commands are used to start, abort, and obtain status of the disk sanitization process. This process runs in the background and sanitizes the disk by writing the entire disk with each of the defined patterns. The set of all pattern writes defines a cycle; both pattern and cycle count parameters can be specified by the user. Depending on the capacity of the disk and the number of patterns and cycles defined, this process can take several hours to complete. When the process has completed, the disk is in the sanitized state. The disk sanitize release command allows the user to return a sanitized disk to the spare pool.

The disk maint start, disk maint abort, and disk maint status commands are used to start, abort, and obtain status of the disk maintenance test process from the command line. This test process can be invoked by the user through this command or invoked automatically by the system when it encounters a disk that is returning non-fatal errors. The goal of disk maintenance is to either correct the errors or remove the disk from the system. The disk maintenance command executes either a set of predefined tests defined for the disk type or the user specified tests. Depending on the capacity of the disk and the number of tests and cycles defined, this process can take several hours to complete.

USAGE

disk assign {<disk_name> | all | [-T <storage type>] -n <count> | auto }
[-p <pool>]
[-o <ownername>]
[-s {<sysid>|unowned}]
[-c {block|zoned}] [-f]

Used to assign ownership of a disk to the specified system. Available only on systems with softwarebased disk ownership. The disk_name or all or [-T <storage_type>] -n count or auto option is required. The keyword all will cause all unassigned disks to be assigned. The -n count option will cause the number of unassigned disks specified by count to be assigned. If the -T {ATA | EATA FCAL | LUN | SAS | SATA | SCSI | XATA | XSAS} option is specified along with the -n count option only disks with the specified type are selected up to count. The auto option will cause any disks eligible for auto-assignment to be immediately assigned, irregardless of the setting of the disk.auto_assign option. Unowned disks which are on loops where only 1 filer owns the disks and the pool information is the same will be assigned. The pool value can be either 0 or 1. If the disks are unowned and are being assigned to a non-local filer, either the ownername and/or sysid parameters need to be specified to identify the filer. The -c option is only valid for Gateway Filers. It can be used to specify the checksum type for the LUN. The -f option needs to be specified if the filer already owns the disk.

To make an owned disk unowned, use the `-s unowned’ option. The local node should own this disk. Use -f option if the disk is not owned by the local node and may result in data corruption if the current owner of the disk is up.

disk fail [-i] [-f] <disk_name>
Force a file system disk to be failed. The disk fail command is used to remove a file system disk that may be logging excessive errors and requires replacement.

If disk fail is used without options, the disk will first be marked as “prefailed”. If an appropriate spare is available, it will be selected for Rapid RAID Recovery. In that process, the prefailed disk will be copied to the spare. At the end of the copy process, the prefailed disk is removed from the RAID configuration. The filer will spin that disk down, so that it can be removed from the shelf. (disk swap must be used when physically removing SCSI disks.)

The disk being removed is marked as “broken”, so that if it remains in the disk shelf, it will not be used by the filer as a spare disk. If the disk is moved to another filer, that filer will use it as a spare. This is not a recommended course of action, as the reason that the disk was failed may have been because it needed to be replaced.

Option -i can be used to avoid Rapid RAID Recovery and remove the disk from the RAID configuration immediately. Note that when a file system disk has been removed in this manner, the RAID group to which the disk belongs will enter degraded mode (meaning a disk is missing from the RAID group). If a suitable spare disk is available, the contents of the disk being removed will be reconstructed onto that spare disk.

If used without options, disk fail issues a warning and waits for confirmation before proceeding. Option -f can be used to skip the warning and force execution of the command without confirmation.

disk maint start
[-t test_list] [-c cycle_count] [-f] [-i] -d disk_list

Used to start the Maintenance Center tests on the disks listed. The -t option defines the tests that are to be run. The available tests are displayed using the disk maint list command. If no tests are specified, the default set of tests for the particular disk type are run. The -c option specifies the number of cycles of the test set to run. The default is 1 cycle.

If a filesystem disk is selected and the -i option is not specified, the disk will first be marked as pending. If an appropriate spare is available, it will be selected for Rapid RAID Recovery. In that process, the disk will be copied to the spare. At the end of the copy process, the disk is removed from the RAID configuration and begins Maintenance Center testing. The -i option avoids Rapid RAID Recovery and removes the disk immediately from the RAID configuration to start Maintenance Center testing. Note that when a filesystem disk has been removed in this manner, the RAID group to which the disk belongs will enter degraded mode (meaning a disk is missing from the RAID group). If a suitable spare disk is available, the contents of the disk being removed will be reconstructed onto that spare disk.

If used without the -f option on filesystem disks, disk maint start issues a warning and waits for confirmation before proceeding. The -f option can be used to skip the warning and force execution of the command without confirmation.

The testing may be aborted with the disk maint abort command.

disk maint abort disk_list

Used to terminate the maintenance testing process for the specified disks. If the testing was started by the user, the disk will be returned to the spare pool provided that the tests have passed. If any tests have failed, the disk will be failed.

disk maint status [-v] [ disk_list]

Return the percent of the testing that has completed for either the specifed list of disks or for all of the testing disks. The -v option returns an expanded list of the test status.

disk maint list

List the tests that are available.

disk reassign [-o <old_name> | -s <old_sysid>] [-n <new_name>] -d <new_sysid>
Used to reassign disks. This command can only be used in maintenance mode after a nvram card swap. Available only on systems with software-based disk ownership.

disk remove [-w] <disk_name>

Remove the specified spare disk from the RAID configuration, spinning the disk down when removal is complete. You can use disk remove to remove a spare disk so that it can be used by another filer (as a replacement for a failed disk or to expand file system space). The option -w is valid for gateway filer only and can be used to wipe out the label of the removing spare disk.

disk replace start [-f] [-m] <disk_name> <spare_disk_name>

This command uses Rapid RAID Recovery to copy data from the specified file system disk to the specified spare disk. At the end of that process, roles of disks are reversed. The spare disk will replace the file system disk in the RAID group and the file system disk will become a spare. The option -f can be used to skip the confirmation. The option -m allows mixing disks with different characteristics. It allows using the target disk with rotational speed that does not match that of the majority of disks in the aggregate. It also allows using the target disk from the opposite spare pool.

disk replace stop <disk_name>

This command can be used to abort disk replace, or to prevent it if copying did not start.

disk sanitize start
[-p <pattern>|-r [-p <pattern>|-r [-p <pat_tern>|-r]]] [-c <cycles>] <disk_list>

Used to start the sanitization process on the disks listed. The -p option defines the byte pattern(s) and the number of write passes in each cycle. The -r option may be used to generate a write of random data, instead of a defined byte pattern. If no patterns are specified, the default is 3 using pattern 0x55 on the first pass, 0xaa on the second, and 0x3c on the third. The -c option specifies the number of cycles of pattern writes. The default is 1 cycle.

All sanitization process information is written to the log file at /etc/sanitization.log. The serial numbers of all sanitized disks are written to /etc/sanitized_disks.

disk sanitize abort <disk_list>

Used to terminate the sanitization process for the specified disks. If the disk is in the format stage, the process will be aborted when the format is complete. A message will be displayed when the format is complete and when an abort is complete.

disk sanitize status [ <disk_list>]

Return the percent of the process that has completed for either the specifed list of disks or for all of the currently sanitizing disks.

disk sanitize release <disk_list>

Modifies the state of the disk(s) from sanitized to spare, and returns disk(s) to the spare pool.

disk scrub start

Start a RAID scrubbing operation on all RAID groups. The raid.scrub.enable option is ignored; scrubbing will be started regardless of the setting of that option (the option is applicable only to scrubbing that gets started periodically by the system).

disk scrub stop

Stop a RAID scrubbing operation.

disk show [ -o <ownername> | -s <sysid> | -n | -v | -a]

Used to display information about the ownership of the disks. Available only on systems with software-based disk ownership. -o lists all disks owned by the filer with the name <ownername>. -s lists all disks owned by the filer with the serial number <sysid>. -n lists all unassigned disks. -v lists all disks. -a lists all assigned disks.

disk swap

Applies to SCSI disks only. It stalls all I/O on the filer to allow a disk to be physically added or removed from a disk shelf. Typically, this command would be used to allow removal of a failed disk, or of a file system or spare disk that was prepared for removal using the disk fail or disk remove command. Once a disk is physically added or removed from a disk shelf, system I/O will automatically continue.

NOTE: It is important to issue the disk swap command only when you have a disk that you want to physically remove or add to a disk shelf, because all I/O will stall until a disk is added or removed from the shelf.

disk unswap

Undo a disk swap command, cancel the swap operation and continue service.

disk upgrade_ownership

Used to upgrade disks from the old ownership model to the new software-based disk ownership. Only available in Maintenance mode. Only used on systems which are being upgraded to use software-based disk ownership.

disk zero spares

Zero all non-zeroed RAID spare disks.

SEE ALSO

aggr sysconfig , vol


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dgateways

July 7th, 2009

Table of Contents

NAME

dgateways – default gateways list

SYNOPSIS

/etc/dgateways

DESCRIPTION

The use of /etc/dgateways file has been deprecated. Either add a static default gateway in /etc/rc or enable router discovery in routed to discover multiple default gateways.

The /etc/dgateways file is used by the old routed command to construct a set of potential default gateways. The file comprises a series of lines, each in the following format:

gateway metric

gateway is the name or address of a gateway to be used as a potential default gateway.

metric is a metric indicating the preference weighting of the gateway. 1 is the value to use for highest preference, 15 for the least. If no value is specified, metric will default to the value 1.

There can be a maximum of 128 valid entries in the /etc/dgateways file – additional ones will be ignored, with an error message being displayed. Duplicate gateway names or addresses are not allowed – only the first one encountered in the file will be added by routed to the default gateway table, and the additional ones will produce error messages.

EXAMPLE

Here are typical lines from the /etc/dgateways file:
  main_router    1   backup_router  2 

SEE ALSO

routed , rc ,

NOTES

The use of /etc/dgateways file has been deprecated.


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df

July 7th, 2009

Table of Contents

NAME

df – display free disk space

SYNOPSIS

df [ -i | -r | -s ]
[ -h | -k | -m | -g | -t ]
[ -A | -V ]
[ -L ]
[ pathname | aggrname ]

DESCRIPTION

df displays statistics about the amount of free disk space in one or all volumes or aggregates on a filer. All sizes are reported in 1024-byte blocks, unless otherwise requested by one of the -h, -k, -m, -g, or -t options.

The pathname parameter is the pathname to a volume. If it is specified, df reports only on the corresponding volume; otherwise, it reports on every online volume. The -V option allows the default scope (volume) to be specified explicitly.

When the -A option is used, then aggrname should instead be the name of an aggregate; when the -A option is used and no aggrname is specified, df reports on every online aggregate. This option displays the space used by the aggregates in the system, including those embedded in tra_ditional volumes.

If the volume being displayed is a FlexCache volume (see flexcache ), then the values displayed will be those of the volume being cached. This acts exactly as if the user had issued the df command on the origin filer itself. If the remote source volume is unavailable, the relevant values will be displayed as `—‘. If a mix of FlexCache and non-FlexCache volumes are being displayed, then the non-FlexCache volumes will display local state.

To view information of the local storage of FlexCache volumes, the -L flag can be used. All flags other than -A are valid in conjunction with -L, as FlexCache operates on a volume level and consequently aggregate information is unavailable. Use of -L does not cause any traffic to the origin filer.

For each volume or aggregate, df displays statistics about snapshots on a separate line from statistics about the active file system. The snapshot line reports the amount of space consumed by all the snapshots in the system. Blocks that are referenced by both the active file system and by one or more snapshots are counted only in the active file system line, not in the snapshot line.

If snapshots consume more space than has been reserved for them by the snap reserve command (see snap ), then the excess space consumed by snapshots is reported as used by the active file system as well as by snapshots. In this case, it may appear that more blocks have been used in total than are actually present in the file system.

With the -r option, df displays the amount of reserved space in the volume. The reserved space is already counted in the used space, so the -r option can be used to see what portion of the used space represents space reserved for future use. This value will appear in parentheses if the volume is a flexible volume and its storage is not guaranteed; in this case no physical storage has been reserved and the reservation is effectively disabled. With the -s option, df displays the amount of disk space that has been saved by block sharing within the volume.

The -h option scales the units of each size-related field to be KB, MB, GB, or TB, whichever is most appropriate for the value being displayed. The -k, -m, -g, and -t options scale each size-related field of the output to be expressed in kilobytes, megabytes, gigabytes, or terabytes respectively. Unit values are based on powers of two. For example, one megabyte is equal to 1, 048, 576 bytes.

With the -i option, df displays statistics on the number of free inodes.

EXAMPLES

The following example shows file system disk space usage:
   toaster> df   Filesystem          kbytes   used     avail   capacity Mounted on   /vol/vol0           4339168  1777824  2561344 41%      /vol/vol0   /vol/vol0/.snapshot 1084788  956716   128072  88%      /vol/vol0/.snapshot 

If snapshots consume more than 100% of the space reserved for them, then either the snapshot reserve should be increased (using snap reserve) or else some of the snapshots should be deleted (using snap delete ). After deleting some snapshots, it may make sense to alter the volume’s snapshot schedule (using snap schedule) to reduce the number of snapshots that are kept online.

The following example shows file system inode usage for a specified volume:

   toaster> df -i /vol/vol0   Filesystem          iused    ifree    %iused  Mounted on   /vol/vol0           164591   14313    92%     /vol/vol0 

You can increase the number of inodes in a file system at any time using the maxfiles command (see maxfiles).

The following example shows disk space usage for aggregate aggr1:

   toaster> df -A aggr1   Aggregate           kbytes   used     avail   capacity   aggr1               4339168  1777824  2561344 41%   aggr1/.snapshot     1084788  956716   128072  88% 

The following example shows the statistics of block sharing on volumes.

   toaster> df -s   Filesystem          used     saved    %saved   /vol/vol0           2294520  0   /vol/dense_vol      169708   81996    32%   /vol/dedup_vol      19640    3620     15% 

The disk space savings generated by the shared space is shown in the saved column. The space used plus the space saved would be the total disk space usage, if no space was shared. The %saved is calculated as [saved / (used + saved)].

VFILER CONSIDERATIONS

When run from a vfiler context, (e.g. via the vfiler run command), df displays information about only those filesystems that are owned by the concerned vfiler.

SEE ALSO

maxfiles , rc , snap aggr vol

BUGS

On some NFS clients, the df command does not follow the NFS protocol specification correctly and may display incorrect information about the size of large file systems. Some versions report negative file system sizes; others report a maximum file system size of 2 GB, no matter how large the file system actually is.


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dd

July 7th, 2009

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NAME

dd – copy blocks of data

SYNOPSIS

dd [ [if= file ] | [ din= disknum bin= blocknum ] ] [ [of= file ] | [ dout= disknum bout= blocknum ] ] count= number_of_blocks

DESCRIPTION

dd copies the specified number of blocks from source to destination. Source and destination may be specified as either a file that is a fully qualified pathname, or as a starting block on a disk. The parameter disknum may range from zero to the maximum number reported by sysconfig -r. In the latter form of specifying source or destination, both disknum and blocknum must be specified. If the source is missing, input is taken from standard input; if the destination is missing, output is sent to standard output. If the number of blocks exceeds the size of the file, copying stops upon reaching EOF.

SEE ALSO

sysconfig


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date

July 7th, 2009

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NAME

date – display or set date and time

SYNOPSIS

date [ -u ] [ [[[[<cc>]<yy>]<mm>]<dd>]<hhmm>[.<ss>] ]

date [ -u ] -c

date [ -f ] -c initialize

DESCRIPTION

date displays the current date and time of the system clock when invoked without arguments.

When invoked with an argument, date sets the current date and time of the system clock; the argument for setting the date and time is interpreted as follows:

cc
First 2 digits of the year (e.g., 19 for 1999).

yy
Next 2 digits of year (e.g., 99 for 1999).

mm
Numeric month. A number from 01 to 12.

dd
Day, a number from 01 to 31.

hh
Hour, a number from 00 to 23.

mm
Minutes, a number from 00 to 59.

ss
Seconds, a number from 00 to 59.

If the first 2 digits of the year are omitted, and the 2nd 2 digits are > 68, a date in the 1900s is used, otherwise a date in the 2000s will be assumed. If all 4 digits of the year are omitted, they default to the current year. If the month or day are omitted, they default to the current month and day, respectively. If the seconds are omitted, they default to 0.

Time changes for Daylight Saving and Standard time, and for leap seconds and years, are handled automatically.

OPTIONS

-u
Display or set the date in GMT (universal time) instead of local time.

-c
Display or set the date and time for the compliance clock instead of the system clock. This option may be used only if one has installed a SnapLock Compliance or SnapLock Enterprise license.

Setting the compliance clock is indicated by -c initialize. This will initialize the compliance clock to the current value of the system clock. Care should taken that to ensure that the system clock is appropriately set before running -c initialize because the compliance clock may only be set once; there is no mechanism for resetting the compliance clock.

-f
Suppress the interactive confirmations that occur when using -c initialize.

CLUSTER CONSIDERATIONS

You cannot use the date command in partner mode to set the date on the failed filer.

EXAMPLES

To set the current time to 21:00:

  date 2100 

To set the current time to 21:00, and the current day to the 6th of the current month:

  date 062100 

To set the current time to 21:00, and the current day to December 6th of the current year:

  date 12062100 

To set the current time to 21:00, and the current day to December 6th, 1999:

  date 9912062100 

To set the current time to 21:00, and the current day to December 6th, 2002:

  date 200212062100 

SEE ALSO

partner , rdate , timezone


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crash

July 7th, 2009

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NAME

crash – directory of system core files

SYNOPSIS

/etc/crash

DESCRIPTION

If a filer crashes, it creates a core file in the crash directory. The core files are very useful for finding and fixing bugs in Data ONTAP, so please notify Network Appliance Global Services of any core files on your filer.

See savecore for more details about how core files are saved.

FILES

/etc/crash/core.*
saved core files /etc/crash/core.*-small compact core file.
/etc/crash/bounds
suffix for next core file
/etc/crash/minfree
free KB in FS to maintain after savecore

SEE ALSO

savecore


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config

July 7th, 2009

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NAME

config – command for configuration management

SYNOPSIS

config clone <filer> <remote_user>

config diff [-o <output_file>] <config_file1> [ <con_fig_file2> ]

config dump [-f] [-v] <config_file>

config restore [-v] <config_file>

DESCRIPTION

The config command is used for managing the configuration of a filer. It allows the user to backup, restore and clone the configuration of a filer.

The config clone <filer> <remote_user> command is used to clone the configuration of a filer, filer. Cloning operation reverts back the filer to the old configuration, if something goes wrong. Filer instance specific information like network interface info.(ip address, netmask etc.), /etc/rc file, license codes and serial number etc. are not cloned. The registry key "default.options.clone.exclude” lists the set of prefixes that are not cloned. At present, we are not cloning the keys, whose prefixes match one of the following prefixes: file.contents.rc, file.contents.hosts, options.if, options.hosts, options.license, options.system.hostname, options.vfconfig. We are also not cloning the volume specific configuration(keys in the options.vols.* namespace). After running this command, reboot the filer for the configuration changes to take effect.

The argument remote_user is specified in the following format : username:passwd, where username is the name of the remote user account and passwd is the password of the remote user account.

The config diff [-o <output_file>] <config_file1> [ <con_fig_file2> ] command finds out the differences between the specified configuration files config_file1 and con_fig_file2. It prints out all the key-value pair mismatches in alphabetical order. This command helps the administrators in configuration auditing. This is also useful to compare the configuration files of the partners in a cluster failover setup to detect configuration mismatches. Use -o option to redirect the output of this command to a file output_file.

The config dump [-f] [-v] <config_file> command backs up the filer configuration into the specified config_file. Configuration is stored as a set of name-value pairs in the backup file. By default, this command backs up only the filer specific (head-specific) configuration. Use -v option for backing up the volume specific configuration also. Use -f option for overriding an existing backup file forcefully.

The config restore [-v] <config_file> command restores the filer configuration information from a backup configuration file, config_file. By default, this command restores only the filer specific configuration available in the config_file. Use -v option, for restoring the volume specific configuration also. After running this command, reboot the filer for the configuration changes to take effect.

In some cases, restore operation may not succeed because the previously saved configuration information is no longer valid. For example, a previous configuration included information about a volume that no longer exists or specifies values (e.g., snapshot reserve) that can no longer be met. In these cases, restore operation reverts back the filer to the old configuration.

For this command, config_file can also be specified as a HTTP URL location, to restore the configuration from remote files. But, config dump command doesn’t support backing up the configurations to a remote location. This will be supported in future releases. HTTP URL location is specified in the following format:

http://[remote_user@]host_name[:port]/path_to_the_backup_file where

remote_user specifies the credentials for the basic http authentication and should be in the following form: user_name[:passwd]

hostname is the name of the http server, like www.mycompany.com.

port is the http port value. If this is not specified, default value 80 (default http port) is used.

path_to_the_backup_file specifies the location of the backup file on the http server.

Note: The configuration file argument {config_file} specified in all the above commands can be one of the following types:

a) A simple file name – this would get saved by default as a file in the /etc/configs directory.

b) A full-path file name.

c) Just a `-‘. In this case, it indicates either standard input or standard output. This value can only be used with config dump and config restore commands. When used with config dump command, the whole filer configuration is written on to the standard output. When used with config restore command, filer configuration information is read from the standard input.

EXAMPLES

Here are a few examples of the use of the config command.
  1. Filer> config clone foo1 root:xxxx   Clones the remote filer,  “foo1’s” configuration on to the   filer executing the clone command,  i.e. on to “Filer”.    2. Filer> config diff 11_30_2000   Compares the filer’s current configuration with the configuration   information available in the backup file /etc/configs/11_30_2000.    3. Filer> config diff 11_30_2000 12_04_2000   Compares the configuration information available in the backup   files /etc/configs/11_30_2000 and /etc/configs/12_04_2000.    4. Assume that test1.cfg and test2.cfg are two sample config files   with the contents shown below:         sample test1.cfg file:           options.auditlog.enable=on           options.autosupport.enable=off           file.contents.hosts.equiv=\\           #Auto-generated by setup Sun May 27 23:46:58 GMT 2001           testfiler1           \\         sample test2.cfg file:           options.autosupport.enable=on           options.sysconfig.boot_check=on           options.sysconfig.boot_errors=console, syslog, autosupport           file.contents.hosts.equiv=\\           #Auto-generated by setup Sun May 27 20:12:12 GMT 2001           testfiler2           \\     Following command displays the differences between the above   two config files.    Filer> config diff test1.cfg  test2.cfg   ## deleted   < options.auditlog.enable=on   ## changed   < options.autosupport.enable=off   ---   > options.autosupport.enable=on   ## new   > options.sysconfig.boot_check=on   ## new   > options.sysconfig.boot_errors=console, syslog, autosupport   ## changed   < file.contents.hosts.equiv=\\   #Auto-generated by setup Sun May 27 23:46:58 GMT 2001   testfiler1   \\   ---   > file.contents.hosts.equiv=\\   #Auto-generated by setup Sun May 27 20:12:12 GMT 2001   testfiler2   \\    5. Filer> config dump 11_30_2000   Backs up the filer specific configuration in /etc/configs/11_30_2000.    6. Filer> config dump /home/user/12_04_2000   Backs up the filer specific configuration in /home/user/12_04_2000.    7. Filer> config dump -v 12_12_2000   Backs up the entire filer (filer specific and volume specifc)   configuration in /etc/configs/12_12_2000.    8. Filer> config restore 11_30_2000   Restores the filer specific configuration from /etc/configs/11_30_2000.    9. Filer> config restore /home/user/12_04_2000   Restores the filer specific configuration from /home/user/12_04_2000.    10. Filer> config restore -v /home/user/12_04_2000   Restores the entire filer (filer specifc and volume specific)   configuration from /home/user/12_04_2000.    11. Filer> config restore http://root:hello@www.foo.com/backup_12_04_2000   Restores the filer specific configuration from a remote file,    backup_12_04_2000,  available on the http server www.foo.com. 


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cloned_tapes

July 7th, 2009

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NAME

cloned_tapes – list of nonqualified tape drives attached to the filer

SYNOPSIS

/etc/cloned_tapes

DESCRIPTION

If you attach a tape drive that Network Appliance has not tested with the filer, enter information about the tape drive in the /etc/cloned_tapes file. This file enables the filer to register the drive as a clone of a qualifed drive.

If the filer boots with a nonqualified tape drive and the /etc/cloned_tapes file does not exist, the filer creates a sample file, when the first "mt" command for the tape is executed.

Each entry in the /etc/cloned_tapes file corresponds to one tape drive. Specify the entry in one of the following formats:

clone_vendor_id clone_product_id EMULATES vendor_id product_id

clone_product_id EMULATES product_id

The "storage show tape supported" command provides a list the product_id and vendor_id values of qualified drives.

EXAMPLE

The following entry in the /etc/cloned_tapes file enables the filer to register the Quantum DLT9000 tape drive, which has not been tested with the filer, as a clone of the Quantum DLT7000 tape drive:

QUANTUM DLT9000 EMULATES QUANTUM DLT7000

SEE ALSO

mt , storage


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